Dedicated to the preservation of California's native plants

The mission of the California Native Plant Society is to increase understanding and appreciation of California’s native plants and to conserve them and their natural habitats through education, science, advocacy, horticulture and land stewardship.

Hot Topics

Centennial Development at Tejon Ranch

Centennial Development at Tejon Ranch

The LA County Board of Supervisors will consider whether or not to approve the proposed Centennial development next Tuesday, December 11. Although this project is located in LA County, we believe this is an issue that impacts all of California, both in terms of our...

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Save the date

CNPS-SLO ANNUAL BANQUET WILL BE HELD JANUARY 12, 2019 AT THE MORRO BAY VETS HALL.  Details coming...

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Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolium)

Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolium)

Toyon, Heteromeles arbutifolium is a wonderful, hardy, native California evergreen shrub. It can be a good screen in the yard, growing up to 6 feet fairly quickly. It tolerates soils from serpentine to clay, to sand. It is not as flammable as other chaparral shrubs. It is a great forage plant for bees, butterflies, and …

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Membership News

Your gifts of membership are what sustain the chapter and ensures our vital work in conservation, education, horticulture and plant science continues to grow and flourish.

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Wildflowers of San Luis Obispo 2nd Edition

Wildflowers of San Luis Obispo 2nd Edition

The Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition of our wonderful Wildflowers of San Luis Obispo, California has arrived just in time for the holidays! 20 new plants have been added and the SLO City open space map has been updated including trailhead directions. The new cover photograph of Woolly Blue Curls with the distant view of an oak studded grassy hillside puts you on our Central Coast.

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Invasive Species Report – Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Invasive Species Report – Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

The extremely invasive Foeniculum vulgare is in the carrot (Apiaceae) family. It is native to Southern Europe and is problematic in coastal California and is also present throughout the western US all the way to Texas. I’ve encountered Fennel on Santa Catalina Island...

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President’s Message December 2018

President’s Message December 2018

In past issues of Obispoensis, I have noted some of my observations on the impact of invasive plants in our state – their negative effects and a bit on their historical introductions. My musings on the origins of such a domineering presence by these plants,  led me to...

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Growing Native Plants from Seeds is Fun

Growing Native Plants from Seeds is Fun

For a native plant novice like me, joining the California Native Plant Society seemed like a good idea so I became a member of the San Luis Obispo chapter. My spouse and I attended our first meeting a year ago last October. That is where I met Marti and the real fun began.

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Botta’s pocket gopher

Botta’s pocket gopher

Last month we discussed California ground squirrel problems, this month I will focus on the gopher aka Botta’s pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae). For most of us, gophers can sometimes be a headache but a livable one. They come and go between you and your neighbor’s yard, only losing a couple of plants a year. For yards like these I recommend using …

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Salvia spathacea (Hummingbird Sage)

Salvia spathacea (Hummingbird Sage)

The cover of this Obispoensis is another beautiful water color by Heather Johnson. In our area Hummingbird sage can grow in an extensive mat. Its leaves are large (10 in (20 cm) long and 3 in (8 cm) wide). The leaf surface appears quilted. Its family affiliation (Mint or Lamiaceae or Labitae) is shown clearly in Heather’s water color.

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Defeat Dudleya Poaching through Propagation

Defeat Dudleya Poaching through Propagation

California Dudleyas are easy to grow. Illegal wild collection can be disrupted via legal propagation. I propagate Dudleya with middle school science classes. If seventh-graders can grow these natives from seed, you can too. Home gardens are a good source of Dudleya...

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Event Calendar

< 2018 >
February
«
»
  • 15
    15.February.Thursday

    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    02-15-2018
    SLO Vets Hall
    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    Predicting Future Climate Change and its Impacts

    Dr. David Chipping

    Dr. David Chipping is Emeritus Professor of Geology from Cal Poly. He received a BS in geology from the Cambridge University, and an MS and PhD in geohydrology and geology from Stanford University. He joined the faculty at Cal Poly in 1971. While spending much of his life kicking plants out of the way to see the rocks, his wife, Linda, got him to kick the rocks to see the plants. In the late 1980s he started doing conservation work with the chapter and continues to this day. He has been state CNPS Conservation Director, has served on the CNPS Board of Directors, has served as chapter
    president, and is a Fellow of the Society. He is heading up a breakout session on Climate Change at the CNPS Conservation Conference the week before our meeting and will also report on how that came out.


    Chapter meetings are generally held the first Thursday of the month at the San Luis Obispo Vets Hall on Grande Ave near the corner of Monterey Street.

    Our meetings kick off with a social time that begins at 7:00 p.m.  This  is a time to sample the treats that members have brought along to share,  and browse the book table. The meeting starts at 7:30 p.m. with some  brief announcements before the program begins.

    Speakers and notes from Chapter Meetings are documented in each  Obispoensis newsletter. Please see the Obispoensis archive for PDF file  of each newsletter.

  • 24
    24.February.Saturday

    9:00 am-12:00 pm
    02-24-2018
    Lopez Lake - Upper Lopez Canyon Road Entrance
    1928 Upper Lopez Canyon Rd, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420, USA

    Saturday, February 24, 9:00 am, Lopez Lake Plant and Bird Walk

    Join Audubon, California Native Plants, and Sierra Club on a plant and bird walk. Expect to hike about 4 miles with a 200-foot elevation gain. We will be looking for waterfowl, which should be plentiful and visible along the trail, as well as an abundance of early spring flowers. A continuation hike to the top of the Duna Vista lookout is an option.  Directions: From Arroyo Grande, follow the signs towards Lopez Lake. After crossing the dam, but before entering Lopez Lake County Park, turn right on Hi Mountain Road and proceed 0.8 miles to the junction of Upper Lopez Canyon Road. Bear left on Canyon Road and proceed 3.6 miles to the old entrance of the Boy Scout Camp (now part of the County Park). Enter the gate, if open, if not park along the side of the road. Restrooms are available. No day use fees will be charged. Bring water and snacks, and dress in layers for changing weather. A hat, sunscreen, and sturdy shoes are recommended. For more information, call Bill at (805) 459-2103 or bill.waycott@gmail.com. Rain or the threat of rain cancels.

    Green-bark Ceanothus

    Chalk Dudleya image

    Chalk Dudleya

    Henbit image

    Henbit

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