Heteromeles arbutifolia (Toyon)

Heteromeles arbutifolia (Toyon)

What native plant has more name recognition than Heteromeles arbutifolia, or some times, commonly known as Christmas Berry and California Holly. It is the sole species in the genus Heteromeles. Back in the 1920’s, people in southern California were drawn to the plant because is looked like holly. Some even believe that Hollywood was named after the large concentrations of the species growing on the slopes of the subdivision. (more…)

Read the Label to Protect Our Bees

Garden Products That Might Be Harmful to Bees

BeeAction.org warns that any gardening product than contains one or more of the following compounds should be avoided if you want to protect our bees. These are Acetamiprid, Clothianidin, Dinotefuran, Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam. (more…)

Invasive Species: Brassica tournefortii (Saharan mustard)

Invasive Species: Brassica tournefortii (Saharan mustard)

Brassica tournefortii is in the Mustard family. It is native to the desert areas of the Mediterranean region of Europe. It has expanded its distribution in the sandy soils of Los Osos, most probably spread during the sewer project, and can rapidly overtake other plants and form a monoculture. (more…)

Climate Change and CNPS

With record global temperatures, giant storms, extended tree-killing droughts, and all the other assorted disasters we are experiencing, our fears that we humans are messing up the planet are becoming true. For CNPS, we see a lot of potential threats to the flora, as if the dead oaks and Sierra Nevada pines weren’t evidence enough. (more…)

President’s Notes February 2018

I received a telephone call last month, from a US Mail carrier who works in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties, asking for information and ideas on ways to do something meaningful in the aftermath of the Thomas Fire.  At the time, I was moved – and still am as I reflect on our conversation – by the honest, soul-searching attitude that motivated her to reach out to CNPS in the first place.  I wrote back to her about a week later with a few links to information addressing the phenomenon of fire in California landscapes.  Now a month has passed along with the tragedies in Montecito.  I wrote back to her recently with these words (below), in an attempt to shed a bit of light on the causes and consequences of living in our natural surroundings. (more…)

CNPS-SLO Banquet 2018

CNPS-SLO Banquet 2018

California Native Plant Society – San Luis Obispo Chapter

Annual Potluck Banquet

Saturday, January 20, 2018

5:30-9:30 pm

(more…)

Gardening Tips for Planting California Natives

With winter on the way, now is the time for us to think about planting California native plants. When we plant in the winter, or rainy season as I like to call it, we take advantage of the moist soil conditions to help establish our plants. Plants planted in the rainy season do most of their growing underground with root development. When spring comes, they respond to this establishing period by sending out new shoot growth. By summer, they are ready for the long dry months ahead and will survive on monthly waterings. (more…)

President’s Notes December 2017

PRESIDENT’S NOTES FROM BILL WAYCOTT

As CNPS enthusiasts, we often are out in the natural surroundings, enjoying the landscapes, breathing fresh air, and getting some exercise. Who hasn’t been out on a trail or a path lately to experience a native plant community or stroll through an oak woodland? For those of us with adventure in our blood, a trip down a trail is our passport to what we study and admire out in nature. The SLO chapter has monthly field trips to destinations around the Central Coast and beyond, where we regularly get out and observe the details of plant life. And, we find this sort of activity quite fulfilling! (more…)

Invasive Species: Dittrichia graveolens (Stinkwort)

Invasive Species: Dittrichia graveolens (Stinkwort)

Dittrichia graveolens is in the Asteraceae family. It is native to the Mediterranean region of Europe. Stinkwort is erect, growing to 2.5 feet. It typically has a conical shape but can have a round appearance. It’s sometimes confused with Russian thistle (tumbleweed). It flowers from September to December and produces tiny seeds. Stinkwort’s foliage has sticky hairs covered in resin that truly stinks and sticks to and stains skin. (more…)

Sudden Oak Death Not Found in SLO’s 2017 SOD BLITZ

Sudden Oak Death Not Found in SLO’s 2017 SOD BLITZ

Kim Corella from Cal Fire has been heading up the search for Phytophora ramorum, the cause of Sudden Oak Death (SOD). She shared the 2017 SOD BLITZ results for SLO County, noting enormous participation with 289 trees sampled! Kim wanted to thank everyone who participated in this year SOD BLITZ. She notes that we were very concerned about gathering more samples in 2017 to determine the extent to which SOD was in SLO County, and is happy to report that 2017 SOD BLITZ was all negative, Apparently the 2016 SOD BLITZ survey showed false positives. The 2017 SOD BLITZ samples were tested by two completely different DNA tests and also by trying to culture out the pathogen on specialized agar. (more…)

Page 1 of 1012345...10...Last »