President’s Notes February 2015

President’s Notes February 2015

President’s Notes from Outgoing President

These are my last notes to this column, as the President’s position has passed into the capable hands Of Bill
Waycott. Similarly, Dr. David Keil is replacing Dr. Matt Ritter in the Vice-President’s position. Matt has done a
fantastic job of bringing speakers to our meetings and will continue to be a great resource for our Chapter. We
welcome David and consider ourselves lucky to have recruited such a world-recognized talent.

I am not going away, as I will retain my Conservation position on the Board. David Krause will continue his excellent service as Treasurer, and Kristie Haydu as Secretary. Although I was seven years in this position, it was made easy by the wonderful people on the Board who are some of the greatest people I have known.

Bill has lots of ideas and will welcome your input as we build our plans for the rest of 2015 and into 2016. Thanks you everybody for your kind support.

– David Chipping

February Chapter Meeting Featuring Natalie Rossington

February Chapter Meeting Featuring Natalie Rossington

Title: February Chapter Meeting Featuring Natalie Rossington
Location: San Luis Obispo Vets Hall, 801 Grand Avenue, San Luis Obispo
Description:

Program: Natalie Rossington, a Master’s student at Cal Poly. Natalie is studying how rare species are able to exist near common and widespread relatives by investigating reproductive barriers between Layia jonesii, a rare serpentine endemic, and Layia platyglossa in Reservoir Canyon.

She investigated both pre-zygotic and post-zygotic barriers using a combination of field and greenhouse experiments. She will present her results and discuss how these results help us understand how rare, serpentine endemics survive and persist.

Natalie Rossington received an undergraduate degree in Soil Science at Cal Poly. She is a Malcolm McLeod Scholarship awardee. She enjoys botanizing in the spring, photography, and cooking in her free time. She grew up in Santa Barbara and currently lives in Morro Bay.

Start Time: 19:00
Date: 2015-02-05

Three Bridges Oak Preserve  project

Three Bridges Oak Preserve project

Three members of CNPS attended the Atascadero City Council meeting Tuesday night to witness the council’s deliberation of the Three Bridges Oak Preserve project. This 100 plus acre property was originally proposed for open space back in 1988 and has been slowly making it’s way towards protection during the ensuing years.  In 2011 the Atascadero Land Preservation Society (ALPS) acquired the property and then made plans to work with the city to create an open space park located west of the city along State Route 41.  After a lengthy presentation, the floor was opened to public comment.  Roughly ten members of the public voiced their concerns about the project, while roughy 20 members of the public voiced their support.  Lauren Brown spoke as a local resident, explaining the role of CNPS in advocating for native plants and our organization’s support the project and any future native plant work to be done at the site.  Bill Waycott spoke about the many field trips CNPS has conducted at all of Atascadero’s open spaces (Bob Green, Pine Mountain, Stadium Park, etc.) and the wide range of participants that have come from throughout the county including school groups, indicating how important the Three Bridges project will be to amplify these events.  David Chipping did not speak.  After further deliberation by the council, the final vote was taken and the project was unanimously approved.  Towards the end of the deliberations, each of the council members spoke about their childhood memories growing up in Atascadero and using the open space that surrounded the city as a place to play and be in nature.  Each one of them also mentioned further that they wanted to insure these same experiences would be available for future generations.

CNPSSLO Banquet 2015

California Native Plant Society —

San Luis Obispo Chapter

Annual Potluck Banquet

Saturday, January 24, 2015

5:30-9:30 pm

Morro Bay Community Center

1001 Kennedy Way, Morro Bay

 

Social Hour – 5:30 pm

Buffet Style Potluck Dinner – 6:30 pm

Chapter business – 7:30 pm

Program: “Preserving California’s Pristine Lands” – 8:00 pm

Program:  David Myers, Executive Director of  The Wildlands Conservancy (Windwolves Preserve)

David will speak about the role of the Conservancy in preserving some of California’s most pristine land. He will tell the story of the Conservancy’s crucial conservation , majestic preserves, and award-winning programs through beautiful photography.

Tickets are $10 per person – You may reserve your spot with credit card or PayPal by clicking the Tickets button, or if you prefer, you may send payment to D. Krause, 2706 Newton Drive, Cambria, CA, 93428. Questions? Contact David Krause  at dkincmbria@aol.com or 805-927-5182 Tickets

Potluck suggestions: CNPS will be providing the beer, wine, coffee, tea, and assorted beverages included with the cost of the banquet. Plates, glasses, cups, and napkins will be available; we ask that you bring your own eating utensils, although plastic utensils will be available.

For the dinner potluck, we are asking those with last names beginning with the following letters to bring the suggested item (and serving utensils). However, if you have a dish you especially want to share with the group, please feel free to bring it or contact Lauren (805-460-6329, lbrown805@charter.net) for alternative suggestions.

A to H: dessert
I to Q: main meat or veggie dish
R to Z: salad (with dressing) or side dish

Please put your name on a label or piece of tape on your serving items so they can be returned to you.

Driving Directions: Exit Hwy 1 at Morro Bay Boulevard. At the “roundabout” turn right onto Quintana Road, and left onto Kennedy Way (after Albertson’s). Go ½ block. Community Center is on the right.

If you have any questions, please contact Lauren at lbrown805@charter.net, or 805-460-6329.

Hope to see you there!

 

Lopez Lake with Audubon, CNPS, & Sierra Club

Title: Lopez Lake with Audubon, CNPS, & Sierra Club
Location: Lopez Lake
Description: Join Audubon, California Native Plants, and Sierra Club on a bird and plant walk.
Expect to hike about 4 miles with a 200 foot elevation gain. We will be looking for waterfowl, which should be plentiful and visible along the trail, as well as an abundance of early spring flowers. A continuation hike to the top of the Duna Vista lookout is an option.

Directions: From Arroyo Grande, follow the signs towards Lopez Lake. After crossing the dam, but before entering Lopez Lake County Park, turn right on Hi-Mountain Road and proceed 0.8 miles to the junction of Upper Lopez Canyon Road. Bear left on Canyon Road and proceed 3.6 miles to the old entrance of the Boy Scout Camp (now closed). At this point, park along the side of the road. Restrooms are available. No day use fees will be charged as parking is outside of the fee area.

Bring water and snacks, and dress in layers for changing weather. A hat, sunscreen, and sturdy
shoes are recommended .

For more information, call Bill at (805)459-2103 or email:bill.waycott@gmail.com.

Rain or the threat of rain cancels.

Start Time: 09:00
Date: 2015-02-01

CNPS-SLO Banquet 2015

California Native Plant Society —

San Luis Obispo Chapter

Annual Potluck Banquet

Saturday, January 24, 2015

5:30-9:30 pm

Morro Bay Community Center

1001 Kennedy Way, Morro Bay

 

Social Hour – 5:30 pm

Buffet Style Potluck Dinner – 6:30 pm

Chapter business – 7:30 pm

Program: “Preserving California’s Pristine Lands” – 8:00 pm

Program:  David Myers, Executive Director of  The Wildlands Conservancy (Windwolves Preserve)

David will speak about the role of the Conservancy in preserving some of California’s most pristine land. He will tell the story of the Conservancy’s crucial conservation , majestic preserves, and award-winning programs through beautiful photography.

Tickets are $10 per person – You may reserve your spot with credit card or PayPal by clicking the Tickets button, or if you prefer, you may send payment to D. Krause, 2706 Newton Drive, Cambria, CA, 93428. Questions? Contact David Krause  at dkincmbria@aol.com or 805-927-5182 Tickets

Potluck suggestions: CNPS will be providing the beer, wine, coffee, tea, and assorted beverages included with the cost of the banquet. Plates, glasses, cups, and napkins will be available; we ask that you bring your own eating utensils, although plastic utensils will be available.

For the dinner potluck, we are asking those with last names beginning with the following letters to bring the suggested item (and serving utensils). However, if you have a dish you especially want to share with the group, please feel free to bring it or contact Lauren (805-460-6329, lbrown805@charter.net) for alternative suggestions.

A to H: dessert
I to Q: main meat or veggie dish
R to Z: salad (with dressing) or side dish

Please put your name on a label or piece of tape on your serving items so they can be returned to you.

Driving Directions: Exit Hwy 1 at Morro Bay Boulevard. At the “roundabout” turn right onto Quintana Road, and left onto Kennedy Way (after Albertson’s). Go ½ block. Community Center is on the right.

If you have any questions, please contact Lauren at lbrown805@charter.net, or 805-460-6329.

Hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

Planting Natives

Last month’s topic on planting California natives to provide habitat for bees was well received. Continuing on that same theme is this month’s topic: native plants that provide nectar for hummingbirds.

Humming-birds such as Anna’s (Calypte anna) live year-round on the Central Coast. They need lots of nectar to buzz around. Here are some of my favorite shrubs that are a
hummingbird’s best friend: manzanita (Arctostaphylos species), twinberry (Lonicera involucrata), fuchsia-flowered gooseberry (Ribes speciosum) and last, pitcher sage (Lepechinia calycina).

Check your yard for placing your shrubs in the right location. Most require good drainage and full sun. Many California native perennials have flowers that can provide large amounts of nectar. Some of my best picks are, penstemon (Penstemon species), Zauschneria (Epilobium canum), hummingbird sage (Salvia spathacea) and sticky monkeyflower (Mimulus aurantiacus), its old name.

So with winter rains on the way, the timing is right to set new plants in your garden. Keeping this in mind I would like to encourage you to remember the little hummingbird.

Good luck and happy gardening.

– John N.

CNPS Educational Grants

CNPS Educational Grants Program adds two new grant funds this year!

In 2014, two anonymous donors set up two new awards for students studying our native flora! One honors Joan Stewart, recent chair of the Educational Grants Committee and volunteer with CNPS for over 40 years in the San Diego and Alta Peak Chapters and the other honors Karen Callahan, rare plant chair and dedicated volunteer with the Redbud Chapter (see more below).

Each year students and researchers send in proposals by September 30. The Educational Grants Committee reviews the proposals, scoring them on specific criteria set in the guidelines. Then the Committee determines which type of grant is appropriate for each proposal funded and allocates the funds in late November, and announces the decisions at the December Chapter Council meeting. The funds available, number of proposals received, and the merit of the proposals determine the amounts awarded.

The CNPS Educational Grants Program was created in 1983 to award funds to students and researchers studying California’s native flora. The seven funds below were created and added to over the years through the generosity of several major donors, in honor of some of our Society’s most dedicated members and leaders. Five of the awards are endowed funds. In the 31 years of Educational grants we have supported more than 285 students and researchers. The vast majority are students.

Joan Stewart Educational Grant Award: Joan Stewart has served California Native Plant Society in many capacities for over forty years. A lifelong joy for Joan has been to mentor and to encourage students in their research. As part of her desire to support student research, Joan chaired the Educational Grants Committee from 2005 to 2014. The Joan Stewart Educational Grant Award, established in 2014, is an educational grant to be awarded to the student whose California Native Plant Society (CNPS) grant proposal is deemed by the CNPS Educational Grants Committee to be an excellent research project contributing critical information necessary for the conservation of California native plant species and their habitats.

The Karen Callahan Scholarship Award, established in 2014, this award is offered to students engaged in study and/or research relating to native plant conservation, restoration, systematic, or ecology. Such study or research must be directed to plants that grow in Placer or Nevada County habitats. Preference will be given to: a) topics concerning rare plants or communities; b) students from Placer or Nevada Counties; c) students attending Sierra College; California State University, Sacramento; or, UC Davis. We honor Karen Callahan for her extraordinary efforts over the years as a volunteer in the Redbud Chapter of CNPS—especially, her monitoring, protecting, and educating others about rare plants and rare plant communities.

– Josie Crawford

Chapter Elections

The SLO Chapter President has appointed Jim Johnson as nominating committee chair, and the nominating committee is preparing a slate of candidates that will be presented at the December general meeting. At that same meeting, nominations will be accepted from the floor, for either yourself or another member. Election of the four officers—President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary—will be held immediately after nominations are closed.

Our chapter has been fortunate to have a core of dedicated individuals who have filled these positions for multiple years. However, the organization needs new ideas and a broader base of involved leadership. Please consider offering yourself for one of these positions. If you prefer, give Jim a call at 528-0446 to nominate yourself.

Conservation December 2014

Projects before the committee include consideration of the Reissued Draft EIR for the Phillips Refinery Rail Spur on the Nipomo Mesa and the Final EIR for the Oster Quarry east of Santa Margarita. Most of the comments we made on the original DEIR for Phillips were incorporated into the RDEIR.

Golden Oak Borer Beetle

oak borer beetle infestationoak borer beetleIn a very different conservation issue, Lauren Brown arranged for a workshop on impending threats to oak in late October. The revelations of a seemingly unstoppable Golden Oak Borer beetle coming northward from San Diego County was chilling, especially with Sudden Oak Death disease just north of us in Monterey County. The borer is about 10 mm long, black with gold spots on the back, and emerges from the tree in “Capital D” shaped holes about 2-3 mm across the flat side. This is considered diagnostic. The larvae girdle the tree, and can persist in firewood if the dead tree is cut down. Due to the value of oak firewood, transport by campers or firewood dealers could bring the pest into our country at any moment.

Coast live oak is the beetle’s favored target, followed by black oak and canyon live oak. For more information go to www.GSOB.org. I will bring more ID material to the December Meeting.

-David Chipping

Page 20 of 50« First...10...1819202122...304050...Last »