Guidetti Ranch hikes with EcoSLO docents

The trail to Indian Knob, the tallest of the hills south of San Luis Obispo, starts on the Guidetti Ranch near the airport. Access to this area is restricted to a few hikes a year, sponsored by EcoSLO. As native plant enthusiasts, the goal of these hikes, in addition to enjoying the oak studded property and a 360o view at the top, is your chance to view one of the rarest plants in this county, the Indian Knob Mountain Balm, Eriodictyon altissimum. According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service: when this plant was federally listed as an endangered species in 1994, there were fewer than 600 individuals known to exist. The Pismo clarkia, Clarkia speciose, ssp. immaculate, also occurs along this trail. Both of these species are listed by CNPS as extremely rare 1B.1 plants. 
 
Please RSVP the EcoSLO docent listed below to hold a place for the hiking date that suits you and to receive more information about the hike.

Saturday, June 30th at 9:00 AM with Dale – ds2040@gmail.com

Five of the Morros of San Luis Obispo County

Saturday, June 23

Join us for a day on the Morros and learn which plants grow on each of these volcanic plugs.  Ascend one, two, or more. Here are the start times.

  • 7:30 a.m. Islay Hill, 2 miles, 500 ft. gain, moderate. The easternmost of the Morros, with views of five others. To trailhead, take Tank Farm Rd. east past Orcutt Rd, then south on Spanish Oaks Dr., then east on Sweet Bay Lane to end.
  • 9:00 a.m. Cerro San Luis, 4 miles, 1,100 ft. gain, moderate. Has knockout views of SLO. Trailhead at the end of Marsh St., just before on-ramp to Hwy 101 south.
  • Lunch (optional): 11:15 am to 12:00 pm, Throop Park, corner of Cerro Romauldo Street and Cuesta Drive, in SLO.
  • 12:00 p.m. Bishop Peak, 3.5 miles, 950 ft. gain, moderately strenuous. Highest of all the Morros. From Hwy 1, go west on Highland Dr., then right on Patricia Drive. Park at trailhead on Patricia Dr. just before reaching Anacapa Circle.
  • 3:30 p.m. Cerro Cabrillo, 2.5 miles, 800 ft. gain, moderately strenuous. 360-degree views from the Santa Lucia Mts. to coastline. Meet at Quarry Trail trailhead on South Bay Blvd, 1.4 miles south of Hwy 1 or 0.4 miles north of Turri Rd.
  • 6:00 p.m. Black Hill, 3.0 miles, 650 ft. gain, moderate. Ocean views from Montaña de Oro north to San Simeon. From South Bay Blvd, drive into Morro Bay State Park on State Park Road.  Meet at the parking area on the north side of the road, next to restrooms opposite the boat marina, just east of the campground entrance.

Bring water (if hiking more than one Morro, store extra water in your vehicle), lunch and snacks, and dress in layers for changing weather. The day is likely to start and end cool but be quite warm at mid-day. A hat, sunscreen, and sturdy hiking shoes are essential. For more information, contact Bill, (805) 459-2103, bill.waycott@gmail.com.

Chapter Meeting featuring Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson

The CNPS San Luis Obispo monthly meeting is Thursday, June 7 at the San Luis Obispo Veterans Hall. From 7:00 to 7:30 pm we will have the usual social part of our monthly meeting, followed at 7:30 by a chapter business meeting.

Ethnobotany professor Kat AndersonProgram: The Ethnobotany and Associated Stewardship of California Black Oak/Mixed Conifer Forest Ecosystems in the Central and Southern Sierra Nevada as a Model for Restoring Forest Health: Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson.

Kat Anderson has a Ph.D. in Wildland Resource Science from UC Berkeley and is the author of the book Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources. The book was recently chosen by the celebrated permaculture designer Ben Falk, as one of the most important books to read in order to permanently solve food security. Kat has worked with Native Americans for over 25 years, learning how indigenous people judiciously gather and steward native plants and ecosystems in the wild. Her interests are to learn about, celebrate, and restore the similar plant uses, gathering and tending practices, and ethical stances towards nature that are in multiple local cultures here and all around the world.

This talk will discuss the importance of California black oak and associate trees and understory species of the mixed conifer forests to the indigenous people of the Sierra Nevada for food, clothing, basketry, firewood, medicines, and household utensils. The audience will learn about the tremendous stewardship legacy of Sierran Tribes: how they knocked the oak trees with long poles and pruned the branches which helped shape the trees canopies and removed dead or dying wood, and may have spurred new fruitwood growth. Black oaks were managed at the ecosystem level with frequent, low intensity Indian-set fires, in order to open up the forest, promote widely-spaced large-canopied, long-lived oaks and conifers with less insects and pathogens, foster useful legumes, and encourage edible and medicinal mushrooms. I will explore some of the potential results of indigenous stewardship that may contribute to forest health including enhanced mycorhizzal relationships with oaks and conifers, nutrient cycling, soil fertility, enhanced soil moisture-holding capacity, and biological action in the soil.

Dr. Matt Ritter Book Release

Dr. Matt Ritter Book Release

A Tour Through Our Iconic Flora

California Native Plant Society presentation by botany professor and local author Matt Ritter

May 3 (Thursday) 7:30-8:30 PM @ Vet’s Hall at Grand and Monterey, San Luis Obispo

Join us for a book release celebration and visual tour of California’s iconic native flora

There are more than 5,000 native species in California—one in five of which are now rare or endangered.
Matt Ritter will take attendees on a visual tour through the state’s most iconic flora in a lecture based
on his new book, California Plants. A richly photographed field guide to the state’s spectacular native
plants, the book also seeks to raise awareness of the unique beauty that is at risk. Matt will use his beautiful photographs, insight, and humor to share the natural history of California’s fascinating plants. A book signing will follow the presentation.

Author and Presenter
Dr. Matt Ritter is a botany professor in the Biological Sciences Department at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, California, where he studies California’s native plants and cultivated trees. He’s the author of several books, including the funniest and best-selling guide to California’s urban forest, A Californian’s Guide to the Trees among Us (Heyday, 2011). He won the Cal Poly Excellence in Teaching Award and the International Society of Arboriculture Award for Excellence in Education. He’s an avid woodworker, mason, and gardener.

Pismo Preserve

Sunday, April 22, 9:00 am

Join CNPS members at this spectacular natural open space, overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

Meet at the entrance by taking the free shuttle (there is no parking permitted on the grounds). It is recommended you arrive at one of the two shuttle stops by 8:30 am to insure your arrival at the Preserve by 9:00 am. The two shuttle stops are located at: a) Pismo Beach City Hall and b) Dolphin Bay Resort. The shuttle service is provided by Ride-On SLO between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm.

Be sure to bring your wildflower guides, adequate water and food, a hat, sturdy shoes, and dress in layers for the weather.

For more information contact Bill Waycott, (805) 459-2103, bill.waycott@gmail.com.

Rain or the threat of rain cancels.

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