Seed Exchange

10-04-2018 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm
SLO Vets Hall
Address: 801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

The seed exchange is back!

The workshop time slot (6.00-7.15) before the October meeting is reserved for our second seed exchange. So think seed collection. There will be a few minor differences. There has been a request to provide a picture of the plant that the seeds will become. This will help those who might not be familiar with the names choose plants they want to try. Our chapter will supply seed envelopes so we will be asking those bringing seeds to just bring a bulk collection of cleaned seeds labelled with genus and species, where and when it was collected and a picture. There is no need to spend your time separating into little envelopes.

The seed exchange is an opportunity to share seeds from native plants which are growing in your landscape. We will not sell seed. Do remember the legal issues of seed collection. It is illegal to collect seed from private property and public spaces without permission. If you happen to have access to rare plant seed DO NOT collect it. That seed should be reserved for seed banks and those with the skills to nurture the plant to maturity.

Keep in mind that a collection of plants grown from seed has more genetic diversity than plants grown from cuttings. Depending upon what your goal is that may be a positive point. But garden grown plant seed is not ideal for restoration planting. One would want the more pure genetics of a wild population to use for restoration. Plants grown from seed might not be like the parent plant.

There is an article on our website under Resources that has information on seed collection and cleaning (link). You might find it helpful. Find it under Resources > Growing Natives.

Related upcoming events

  • 06-06-2019 7:00 pm - 06-06-2019 9:00 pm

     

    CHAPTER MEETING June 6th 2019 - Thursday - 7:00 pm
    7:00 social, 7:30 program
    Veteran's Hall, Grand Avenue at Monterey, San Luis Obispo

    Reed Kenny, MS Candidate, Cal Poly, CNPS McLeod Scholar, Floristic Survey of Halter Ranch, San Luis Obispo County,
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    Halter Ranch, a portion of which is a working winery, is approximately 2,000 acres in size and has areas of intact oak woodland, grassland and manzanita chaparral. Located in northern SLO County near Adelaida, it includes portions of the historic MacGillivary Ranch, which hasn’t been surveyed by botanists since 1984, and additional areas that may not have been surveyed at all. This talk will summarize the results of this season’s field surveys.

    With Dr.’s Matt Ritter and Dave Keil, Cal Poly.

    Paul Excoffier, MS Candidate, Cal Poly, CNPS McLeod Scholar, Climate Change and San Joaquin Woollythreads (Monolopia congdonii)

    San Joaquin woollythreads, Federally-listed as Endangered, was historically found throughout the rain shadow of the southern Coast Ranges. However, the current range of M. congdonii has been greatly reduced by habitat loss. Current conservation strategies for M. congdonii focus on conserving extant populations and re-establishing populations within its historic range. However, climate change represents a key unknown in determining if these strategies will be successful. This talk will discuss work in progress on testing the performance of M. condonii and other winter annual species under simulated future climates and investigation of its seed longevity.

    With Dr. Nishanta Rajakaruna, Cal Poly, and Ryan O’Dell, Bureau of Land Management.