Chapter Meeting August 1

CNPS will hold its first-ever meeting in August, on Thursday, August 1st, at the SLO Vets’ Hall at 7:00 pm. The featured speaker will Greg Rubin, an expert in native residential landscape design with special emphasis on fire resistant species. Greg will talk on his experience in Southern California, working in chaparral ecosystems. He will present the current approach to best practices for fire-safe plant selection and placement in suburban environs.

Greg Rubin, President and Founder of California’s Own Native Landscape Design, Inc. is a licensed landscape contractor who has worked with California native plants since 1985. His company has designed over 700 native landscapes in Southern California.Specialties include residential, commercial, and institutional landscapes that cover an array of garden styles, while providing year-round appeal, low maintenance, water efficiency, rich habitat, and fire-resistance. Greg has been featured in a number of periodicals including the Wall Street Journal, San Diego Union Tribune and Los Angeles Times, and magazines such as Sunset, San Diego Home and Garden, California Gardener and Kiplinger’s. Media coverage includes repeat appearances on NPR. Greg regularly gives presentations and workshops on native plants to conferences, garden clubs and other organizations throughout Southern California.  Greg is co-author of a new book with Lucy Warren, “The California Native Landscape: The Homeowners’ Design Guide to Restoring its Beauty and Balance”, published by Timber Press. This popular native horticultural work covers all aspects of native landscape design.  Greg also served on the boards of the Agua Hedionda Lagoon Foundation, California Native Plant Society, the Lux Art Institute, and the Garden Native foundation.

Floristic Survey of Halter Ranch

 

CHAPTER MEETING June 6th 2019 – Thursday – 7:00 pm
7:00 social, 7:30 program
Veteran’s Hall, Grand Avenue at Monterey, San Luis Obispo

Reed Kenny, MS Candidate, Cal Poly, CNPS McLeod Scholar, Floristic Survey of Halter Ranch, San Luis Obispo County,
California

Halter Ranch, a portion of which is a working winery, is approximately 2,000 acres in size and has areas of intact oak woodland, grassland and manzanita chaparral. Located in northern SLO County near Adelaida, it includes portions of the historic MacGillivary Ranch, which hasn’t been surveyed by botanists since 1984, and additional areas that may not have been surveyed at all. This talk will summarize the results of this season’s field surveys.

With Dr.’s Matt Ritter and Dave Keil, Cal Poly.

Paul Excoffier, MS Candidate, Cal Poly, CNPS McLeod Scholar, Climate Change and San Joaquin Woollythreads (Monolopia congdonii)

San Joaquin woollythreads, Federally-listed as Endangered, was historically found throughout the rain shadow of the southern Coast Ranges. However, the current range of M. congdonii has been greatly reduced by habitat loss. Current conservation strategies for M. congdonii focus on conserving extant populations and re-establishing populations within its historic range. However, climate change represents a key unknown in determining if these strategies will be successful. This talk will discuss work in progress on testing the performance of M. condonii and other winter annual species under simulated future climates and investigation of its seed longevity.

With Dr. Nishanta Rajakaruna, Cal Poly, and Ryan O’Dell, Bureau of Land Management.

The Diversity and Evolution of Cacti, Dr. James Mauseth

The Diversity and Evolution of Cacti, Dr. James Mauseth

CHAPTER MEETING

March 7, 2019, Thursday, 7 pm

Atascadero Kiwanis Hall

Mixer and Browse Sales Table 7 pm, Program 7:30 pm

The native cacti of California are wonderful, but they are new-comers …

Cacti originated in South America and evolved there for millions of years before any cactus was able to migrate to North America. In South America, there are still cacti that are ordinary leafy trees, cacti adapted to jungles, others that are at home next to snow banks high in the Andes. Argentina has giant columnar cacti that look like California’s saguaros, and nearby grow dwarf cacti that are smaller than your little finger when mature and flowering. Many cacti have spines that are modified into glands that secrete nectar: the cacti have a bargain with ants, trading a bit of sugar water for protection against mites.

James Mauseth is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin, and a world-famous plant anatomist and cactus expert. An award-winning teacher, he has been invited to teach Plant Anatomy at Cal Poly this quarter. Jim’s specialty is plant anatomy, studying the cells and tissues of cacti and comparing them to the equivalent parts of plants that have more ordinary structures typical of non-succulent plants. He has traveled extensively in South America, and is a Fellow of the Cactus and Succulent Society of America. He will present a talk entitled The Evolution and Diversity of Cacti.

A Global Serpentine Travelogue, Dr. Robert Boyd

A Global Serpentine Travelogue, Dr. Robert Boyd

“Boyd’s Black-Haired Bug”

Robert S. Boyd is Alumni Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University, Alabama.

He received his doctorate in Botany from the University of California, Davis in 1986, and a master’s and undergraduate degree from Cal Poly Pomona. He is currently teaching conservation biology and has taught botany and ecology at Auburn University since 1988. His research interests include the management of rare and endangered plants, as well as the ecology and evolution of metal “hyperaccumulator” plants. These are plants that take unusually large amounts of metals into their tissues. In fact, Bob has had an insect species, “Boyd’s Black-Haired Bug” (Melanotrichus boydi) named after him for his work in this area. The bug feeds on the milkwort jewelflower (Streptanthus polygaloides), a nickel hyperaccumulator endemic to the Sierra Nevada.

December Chapter Meeting

December Chapter Meeting

CHAPTER MEETING Dec. 6th  2018 – Thursday – 7:00 pm

  • Veterans Hall, Monterey and Grand, SLO
  • Mixer and Browse Sales Table 7:00 pm, Program 7:30 pm

Program: Carrizo Ecological Reserves, George Butterworth

George grew up in the Central Valley. Among his first memories were cattails and red-wing blackbirds, and crops and orchards. He spent 30 years in Southern California, graduating from UCSB in history. He taught tennis for many years. He came to the Carrizo Plain in 1993 and started collecting plants and enjoying the nature. When California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife acquired south Chimineas in 2001, he worked on the botany there as a volunteer. This led to his getting on the payroll. He continues to botanize both the Chimineas and Carrizo.Plain, and was a major force in producing the digital Plants of Carrizo Plain book. A great number of the photo illustrations are by George.

November Chapter Meeting

November Chapter Meeting

CHAPTER MEETING Nov. 1st  2018 – Thursday – 7:00 pm

Veterans Hall, Monterey and Grand, SLO

Mixer and Browse Sales Table 7:00 pm, Program 7:30 pm

PLANT PROPAGATION by ELLIOT PAULSON

Elliot graduated from Cal Poly in business finance, and horticulture. He established Clearwater Color Nursery in 1987, where he grows annual color, vegetables, Mediterranean type perennials, and succulents along with California Natives. Plants are propagated in plugs, packs and pots both by seed and asexual cuttings. Elliot will tell us what works and what
doesn’t work. He will also engage other plant propagators in the audience. Along with his wife Megan, he runs the nursery on Los Osos Valley road with 13 dedicated employees. The nursery delivers plant material to local retail nurseries, the Central Valley, and Santa Barbara county.

Dessert Potluck and Members’ Slide Show

Bring a dessert to share and your 15 best digital photos. Please bring them on a flash drive and number/letter titles consecutively if you wish to show them in a particular order.

The meeting will be preceded by a Seed Exchange at 6pm.

Seed Exchange

Seed Exchange

The seed exchange is back!

The workshop time slot (6.00-7.15) before the October meeting is reserved for our second seed exchange. So think seed collection. There will be a few minor differences. There has been a request to provide a picture of the plant that the seeds will become. This will help those who might not be familiar with the names choose plants they want to try. Our chapter will supply seed envelopes so we will be asking those bringing seeds to just bring a bulk collection of cleaned seeds labelled with genus and species, where and when it was collected and a picture. There is no need to spend your time separating into little envelopes.

The seed exchange is an opportunity to share seeds from native plants which are growing in your landscape. We will not sell seed. Do remember the legal issues of seed collection. It is illegal to collect seed from private property and public spaces without permission. If you happen to have access to rare plant seed DO NOT collect it. That seed should be reserved for seed banks and those with the skills to nurture the plant to maturity.

Keep in mind that a collection of plants grown from seed has more genetic diversity than plants grown from cuttings. Depending upon what your goal is that may be a positive point. But garden grown plant seed is not ideal for restoration planting. One would want the more pure genetics of a wild population to use for restoration. Plants grown from seed might not be like the parent plant.

There is an article on our website under Resources that has information on seed collection and cleaning (link). You might find it helpful. Find it under Resources > Growing Natives.

Chapter Meeting featuring Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson

The CNPS San Luis Obispo monthly meeting is Thursday, June 7 at the San Luis Obispo Veterans Hall. From 7:00 to 7:30 pm we will have the usual social part of our monthly meeting, followed at 7:30 by a chapter business meeting.

Ethnobotany professor Kat AndersonProgram: The Ethnobotany and Associated Stewardship of California Black Oak/Mixed Conifer Forest Ecosystems in the Central and Southern Sierra Nevada as a Model for Restoring Forest Health: Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson.

Kat Anderson has a Ph.D. in Wildland Resource Science from UC Berkeley and is the author of the book Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources. The book was recently chosen by the celebrated permaculture designer Ben Falk, as one of the most important books to read in order to permanently solve food security. Kat has worked with Native Americans for over 25 years, learning how indigenous people judiciously gather and steward native plants and ecosystems in the wild. Her interests are to learn about, celebrate, and restore the similar plant uses, gathering and tending practices, and ethical stances towards nature that are in multiple local cultures here and all around the world.

This talk will discuss the importance of California black oak and associate trees and understory species of the mixed conifer forests to the indigenous people of the Sierra Nevada for food, clothing, basketry, firewood, medicines, and household utensils. The audience will learn about the tremendous stewardship legacy of Sierran Tribes: how they knocked the oak trees with long poles and pruned the branches which helped shape the trees canopies and removed dead or dying wood, and may have spurred new fruitwood growth. Black oaks were managed at the ecosystem level with frequent, low intensity Indian-set fires, in order to open up the forest, promote widely-spaced large-canopied, long-lived oaks and conifers with less insects and pathogens, foster useful legumes, and encourage edible and medicinal mushrooms. I will explore some of the potential results of indigenous stewardship that may contribute to forest health including enhanced mycorhizzal relationships with oaks and conifers, nutrient cycling, soil fertility, enhanced soil moisture-holding capacity, and biological action in the soil.