Chapter Meeting featuring Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson

The CNPS San Luis Obispo monthly meeting is Thursday, June 7 at the San Luis Obispo Veterans Hall. From 7:00 to 7:30 pm we will have the usual social part of our monthly meeting, followed at 7:30 by a chapter business meeting.

Ethnobotany professor Kat AndersonProgram: The Ethnobotany and Associated Stewardship of California Black Oak/Mixed Conifer Forest Ecosystems in the Central and Southern Sierra Nevada as a Model for Restoring Forest Health: Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson.

Kat Anderson has a Ph.D. in Wildland Resource Science from UC Berkeley and is the author of the book Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources. The book was recently chosen by the celebrated permaculture designer Ben Falk, as one of the most important books to read in order to permanently solve food security. Kat has worked with Native Americans for over 25 years, learning how indigenous people judiciously gather and steward native plants and ecosystems in the wild. Her interests are to learn about, celebrate, and restore the similar plant uses, gathering and tending practices, and ethical stances towards nature that are in multiple local cultures here and all around the world.

This talk will discuss the importance of California black oak and associate trees and understory species of the mixed conifer forests to the indigenous people of the Sierra Nevada for food, clothing, basketry, firewood, medicines, and household utensils. The audience will learn about the tremendous stewardship legacy of Sierran Tribes: how they knocked the oak trees with long poles and pruned the branches which helped shape the trees canopies and removed dead or dying wood, and may have spurred new fruitwood growth. Black oaks were managed at the ecosystem level with frequent, low intensity Indian-set fires, in order to open up the forest, promote widely-spaced large-canopied, long-lived oaks and conifers with less insects and pathogens, foster useful legumes, and encourage edible and medicinal mushrooms. I will explore some of the potential results of indigenous stewardship that may contribute to forest health including enhanced mycorhizzal relationships with oaks and conifers, nutrient cycling, soil fertility, enhanced soil moisture-holding capacity, and biological action in the soil.

Dr. Matt Ritter Book Release

Dr. Matt Ritter Book Release

A Tour Through Our Iconic Flora

California Native Plant Society presentation by botany professor and local author Matt Ritter

May 3 (Thursday) 7:30-8:30 PM @ Vet’s Hall at Grand and Monterey, San Luis Obispo

Join us for a book release celebration and visual tour of California’s iconic native flora

There are more than 5,000 native species in California—one in five of which are now rare or endangered.
Matt Ritter will take attendees on a visual tour through the state’s most iconic flora in a lecture based
on his new book, California Plants. A richly photographed field guide to the state’s spectacular native
plants, the book also seeks to raise awareness of the unique beauty that is at risk. Matt will use his beautiful photographs, insight, and humor to share the natural history of California’s fascinating plants. A book signing will follow the presentation.

Author and Presenter
Dr. Matt Ritter is a botany professor in the Biological Sciences Department at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, California, where he studies California’s native plants and cultivated trees. He’s the author of several books, including the funniest and best-selling guide to California’s urban forest, A Californian’s Guide to the Trees among Us (Heyday, 2011). He won the Cal Poly Excellence in Teaching Award and the International Society of Arboriculture Award for Excellence in Education. He’s an avid woodworker, mason, and gardener.

Chapter Meeting April 2018

The Flora of Baja California

Dave Keil

Thursday, April 19th, 7:00 pm, CNPS Monthly Meeting, SLO Vets’ Hall


Chapter meetings are generally held the first Thursday of the month at the San Luis Obispo Vets Hall on Grande Ave near the corner of Monterey Street.

Our meetings kick off with a social time that begins at 7:00 p.m.  This  is a time to sample the treats that members have brought along to share,  and browse the book table. The meeting starts at 7:30 p.m. with some  brief announcements before the program begins.

Speakers and notes from Chapter Meetings are documented in each  Obispoensis newsletter. Please see the Obispoensis archive for PDF file  of each newsletter.

Chapter Meeting March 2018

Chapter Meeting March 2018

Chapter Meeting, March 8, 2018, Kiwanis Hall, 7848 Pismo Ave, Atascadero, CA 93422

Lynne Dee Althouse with present: Green Energy, Wildflowers & Wildlife — Topaz, a story about planning and process for a solar farm. Lessons learned.


Chapter meetings are generally held the first Thursday of the month at the San Luis Obispo Vets Hall on Grande Ave near the corner of Monterey Street.

Our March meeting often held in Atascadero.

Our meetings kick off with a social time that begins at 7:00 p.m.  This  is a time to sample the treats that members have brought along to share,  and browse the book table. The meeting starts at 7:30 p.m. with some  brief announcements before the program begins.

Speakers and notes from Chapter Meetings are documented in each  Obispoensis newsletter. Please see the Obispoensis archive for PDF file  of each newsletter.

Chapter Meeting February 2018

Predicting Future Climate Change and its Impacts

Dr. David Chipping

Dr. David ChippingDr. David Chipping is Emeritus Professor of Geology from Cal Poly. He received a BS in geology from the Cambridge University, and an MS and PhD in geohydrology and geology from Stanford University. He joined the faculty at Cal Poly in 1971. While spending much of his life kicking plants out of the way to see the rocks, his wife, Linda, got him to kick the rocks to see the plants. In the late 1980s he started doing conservation work with the chapter and continues to this day. He has been state CNPS Conservation Director, has served on the CNPS Board of Directors, has served as chapter
president, and is a Fellow of the Society. He is heading up a breakout session on Climate Change at the CNPS Conservation Conference the week before our meeting and will also report on how that came out.


Chapter meetings are generally held the first Thursday of the month at the San Luis Obispo Vets Hall on Grande Ave near the corner of Monterey Street.

Our meetings kick off with a social time that begins at 7:00 p.m.  This  is a time to sample the treats that members have brought along to share,  and browse the book table. The meeting starts at 7:30 p.m. with some  brief announcements before the program begins.

Speakers and notes from Chapter Meetings are documented in each  Obispoensis newsletter. Please see the Obispoensis archive for PDF file  of each newsletter.

Chapter Meeting December 2017

 

SLO Chapter December 7th Meeting 7:00 social 7:30 program Vets Hall, SLO

Program: Travels with a Geobotanist: Plant Life on Serpentine and other Harsh Soils with Dr. Nishi Rajakaruna

Dr. Nishi Rajakaruna fell in love with plants at a young age during a visit to Sinharaja Rainforest, Sri Lanka. He received a BA in human ecology from the College of the Atlantic, and an MS and PhD in botany from the University of British Columbia. He conducted post-doctoral research in plant ecology at Stanford University. His research examines how plant diversity, ecology, and evolution are influenced by serpentine and other ‘unusual’ soils, including those with heavy metals. He has taught botany at College of the Atlantic and San Jose State University during the last 12 years and is currently an associate professor in plant biology at California Polytechnic State University.

Chapter Meeting

Chapter Meeting

Speaker: Dena Grossenbacher, Alpine plant diversity on Yosemite’s Sky Islands

Dena Grossenbacher is a new Assistant Professor of Botany at CalPoly. She is broadly interested in how plant-environment interactions generate and maintain plant diversity, and the processes underlying the origin and extinction of species. She uses the California flora,
especially monkeyflowers, to address these questions because of their astonishing variation both among and within species.

Dena received a Bachelor’s degree in Botany in 1999 from University of Washington, was a field botanist in the Pacific Northwest and the Yosemite region from 2000-2008, and received a Ph.D. in Population Biology from UC Davis in 2013 with Maureen Stanton. She did postdocs studying mating system evolution at University of Minnesota and at Washington State University before arriving at Cal Poly
in January 2017.


Chapter meetings are generally held the first Thursday of the month at the San Luis Obispo Vets Hall on Grande Ave near the corner of Monterey Street.

Our meetings kick off with a social time that begins at 7:00 p.m.  This  is a time to sample the treats that members have brought along to share,  and browse the book table. The meeting starts at 7:30 p.m. with some  brief announcements before the program begins.

Speakers and notes from Chapter Meetings are documented in each  Obispoensis newsletter. Please see the Obispoensis archive for PDF file  of each newsletter.

Chapter Meeting & Seed Exchange

Chapter Meeting & Seed Exchange

The October meeting of the California Native Plants Society will take place on Thursday evening, October 5th, from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm at the SLO Vets’ Hall, 801 Grand Ave. in San Luis Obispo.

The first half of the meeting will be devoted to a California native seed exchange. If you have an interest in planting native seeds and/or have native seeds to share with others, you are asked to come prepared to participate. During the  meetings, seed traders will share their tips on how to plant the seeds and grow the plants, they brought to share.

The second half of the meeting will feature presentations by local members, reporting on botanical places of interest they visited during the summer. Join us for refreshments (please bring a dessert to share) and some exciting photographs and stories of forays into the wild. If you would like to present some of your tales of discovery out in nature, bring your photos in a viewable format to the meeting, on a thumb drive, or you can e-mail your photos to David Chipping (dchippin@calpoly.edu), 24 hours before the meeting. Dave can also answer any questions about formatting your photos.

Developing a Web-based Tree Identification Key

JUNE 1 IS OUR LAST MEETING TILL FALL

Developing a Web-based Tree Identification Key

The June speaker will be our McLeod scholarship grad student awardee, Kyle Nessen. Kyle’s project is in collaboration with CalFire to create a photographic key to tree identification on the Urban Forest Ecosystems Institute website.

A Photographic Journey of California Lupines with Stuart Wilson

CHAPTER MEETING MAY 4TH IS OUR NEXT MEETING

A Photographic Journey of California Lupines

Stuart Wilson has long held a love and fascination of the genus Lupinus. After many springs spent photographing our local species, he decided to embark on a project to photograph every species and variety (104) found in California. Traveling throughout the state in 2015 and 2016, he has reached his goal (with a few noteworthy exceptions). He will give an overview of the great variety of forms found in the genus with tips on identification.

Stuart Wilson has been interested in photography since high school. After college in Orlando, Florida, he moved to Santa Barbara to study at Brooks Institute. He has traveled extensively in pursuit of nature subjects such as insects, amphibians and reptiles, and other small animals. He markets his photography through Science Source, a stock agency based in New York. He produced most of the photographs for Joan Lentz’s book. A Naturalist’s Guide to the Santa Barbara Region. He is a past president of Channel City Camera Club in Santa Barbara. Visit Stuart’s website to get a taste of the beautiful photographs featured in his talk.

LUPINE WORKSHOP ADDED PRIOR TO MEETING – COME AT 6PM TO ATTEND THE WORKSHOP

The CNPS monthly meeting Thursday, May 4 at the San Luis Obispo Veterans Hall will kick off with a workshop from 6:10 to 7:00 pm on lupine identification led by Dr. Dave Keil.

Our county is home to a diversity of Lupinus species, two of which grow nowhere else.  Dave will give a quick intro to lupine features, and participants will then have the opportunity to try out the draft treatment on Lupinus from the nearly completed second edition of The Vascular Plants of San Luis Obispo County, California.  Bring your hand lenses!


June is bringing a crammed-full sales table to the May meeting. Think of all those birthday gifts you have to buy, all your ugly T-shirts that need replacing, the thank-you gift to your maiden aunt, and the financial support you wish to give CNPS.

NEW ITEM JUST IN TIME FOR SUPERBLOOM. As well as the downloadable version, we have a CD with two versions of the program available at the sales table

 


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