Salmon Creek Trail | Post A list of wildflowers seen along Salmon Creek Trail on April 10, 2014, submitted by Amanda Darling

Coon Creek | PDF 2013 Coon Creek Master Plant List, compiled by Dirk Walters (Sorted By Scientific Name).

Shell Creek | PDF Spring Shell Creek checklist with the addition of 11 species from April 2012 trip, prepared by Dave Keil.

Chimineas RanchPDF Prepared by George Butterworth (2012) and organized like the Jepson Manual.

Calf Canyon | PDF Checklist of Vascular Plants, Calf Canyon and Vicinity (11/2011) by David J. Keil.

Pine Forest Mushroom List for Cambria, CA | PDF What mushrooms might you find in a pine forest? What are their scientific names and common names? Where should you looks – on pinecones, in roadsides and disturbed areas, or in grassy areas? Here is a listing of the fungi you might find in a pine forest in Cambria, California.

Flora of Fern Canyon | PDF Here is a checklist of the flora found at Fern Canyon in the Lodge Hill area of Cambria, California. Noted are scientific and common names as well as whether each plant is an ornamental species escaped from cultivation, an introduced more-or-less weedy species, a crop plant escaped from cultivation, and/or a noxious weed.

Highway 46 Flora | PDF Starting at Hwy 46 and Vineyard drive, head west and start your mileage counter. Four mileage markers are noted with the corresponding natives to see.

Salmon Creek Flora | PDF Plants in flower at Salmon Creek.

Santa Rita Creek Flora | PDF Starting at South Bethel Rd. & Santa Rita Creek Road, heading west on Santa Rita Creek Road and start your mileage counter. Native flora locations are noted for the next 13 miles.

Flora of the Lodge Hill, Cambria area |  PDF A robust list broken down to trees, shrubs, and herbs and ferns, and listing both scientific and common names.

Shell Creek Flora | PDF Wildflowers noted at Shell Creek, including both scientific and common names.

Shell Creek and Vicinity, Nov 2011 | PDF Checklist of Vascular Plants of the Avenales Wildlife Area, Sinton Ranch.

Jack Creek Flora | PDF Large list of Jack Creek wildland native plants by scientific name.

El Chorro Regional Park | PDF Plant list, 1993-1994.

Bud Meyer Los Osos Dunes | PDF Plant list.

California Canyon | PDF Plant list.

View Posts by Category

< 2018 >
June
  • 07

    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    06-07-2018
    SLO Vets Hall
    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    The CNPS San Luis Obispo monthly meeting is Thursday, June 7 at the San Luis Obispo Veterans Hall. From 7:00 to 7:30 pm we will have the usual social part of our monthly meeting, followed at 7:30 by a chapter business meeting.

    Ethnobotany professor Kat AndersonProgram: The Ethnobotany and Associated Stewardship of California Black Oak/Mixed Conifer Forest Ecosystems in the Central and Southern Sierra Nevada as a Model for Restoring Forest Health: Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson.

    Kat Anderson has a Ph.D. in Wildland Resource Science from UC Berkeley and is the author of the book Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources. The book was recently chosen by the celebrated permaculture designer Ben Falk, as one of the most important books to read in order to permanently solve food security. Kat has worked with Native Americans for over 25 years, learning how indigenous people judiciously gather and steward native plants and ecosystems in the wild. Her interests are to learn about, celebrate, and restore the similar plant uses, gathering and tending practices, and ethical stances towards nature that are in multiple local cultures here and all around the world.

    This talk will discuss the importance of California black oak and associate trees and understory species of the mixed conifer forests to the indigenous people of the Sierra Nevada for food, clothing, basketry, firewood, medicines, and household utensils. The audience will learn about the tremendous stewardship legacy of Sierran Tribes: how they knocked the oak trees with long poles and pruned the branches which helped shape the trees canopies and removed dead or dying wood, and may have spurred new fruitwood growth. Black oaks were managed at the ecosystem level with frequent, low intensity Indian-set fires, in order to open up the forest, promote widely-spaced large-canopied, long-lived oaks and conifers with less insects and pathogens, foster useful legumes, and encourage edible and medicinal mushrooms. I will explore some of the potential results of indigenous stewardship that may contribute to forest health including enhanced mycorhizzal relationships with oaks and conifers, nutrient cycling, soil fertility, enhanced soil moisture-holding capacity, and biological action in the soil.

  • 23

    7:30 am-9:00 pm
    06-23-2018
    Islay Hill Trailhead
    Islay Hill Trail, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    Saturday, June 23

    Join us for a day on the Morros and learn which plants grow on each of these volcanic plugs.  Ascend one, two, or more. Here are the start times.

    • 7:30 a.m. Islay Hill, 2 miles, 500 ft. gain, moderate. The easternmost of the Morros, with views of five others. To trailhead, take Tank Farm Rd. east past Orcutt Rd, then south on Spanish Oaks Dr., then east on Sweet Bay Lane to end.
    • 9:00 a.m. Cerro San Luis, 4 miles, 1,100 ft. gain, moderate. Has knockout views of SLO. Trailhead at the end of Marsh St., just before on-ramp to Hwy 101 south.
    • Lunch (optional): 11:15 am to 12:00 pm, Throop Park, corner of Cerro Romauldo Street and Cuesta Drive, in SLO.
    • 12:00 p.m. Bishop Peak, 3.5 miles, 950 ft. gain, moderately strenuous. Highest of all the Morros. From Hwy 1, go west on Highland Dr., then right on Patricia Drive. Park at trailhead on Patricia Dr. just before reaching Anacapa Circle.
    • 3:30 p.m. Cerro Cabrillo, 2.5 miles, 800 ft. gain, moderately strenuous. 360-degree views from the Santa Lucia Mts. to coastline. Meet at Quarry Trail trailhead on South Bay Blvd, 1.4 miles south of Hwy 1 or 0.4 miles north of Turri Rd.
    • 6:00 p.m. Black Hill, 3.0 miles, 650 ft. gain, moderate. Ocean views from Montaña de Oro north to San Simeon. From South Bay Blvd, drive into Morro Bay State Park on State Park Road.  Meet at the parking area on the north side of the road, next to restrooms opposite the boat marina, just east of the campground entrance.

    Bring water (if hiking more than one Morro, store extra water in your vehicle), lunch and snacks, and dress in layers for changing weather. The day is likely to start and end cool but be quite warm at mid-day. A hat, sunscreen, and sturdy hiking shoes are essential. For more information, contact Bill, (805) 459-2103, bill.waycott@gmail.com.