CNPS-SLO encourages the use of California Native plants in public and private gardens and landscapes, and offers information about how to plan, start, and maintain native plant gardens and landscapes that are both ecologically beneficial and personally enjoyable .

Please take the time to cruise though the articles and information in this section of our site. We hope you reach out to us if you have questions about topics not covered here.

Also, if you have expertise in native plant gardening and would like to contribute, we would love to hear from you!

Why Should I Incorporate Native Plants In My Own Garden?

In addition to their natural beauty, natives provide water-conserving, drought-tolerant and sustainable garden design choices. For more information about the benefits of incorporating native plants in your own garden, click here.

What are Native Plants and Why are They Important?

To learn more about the importance of native plant conservation, please click here.

NATIVE PLANTS THAT ATTRACT BIRDS | A very thorough list of native plants with the type of bird that each plant attracts, the part of the plant that is used and in which season. For example, if you wish to see Cedar Waxwings in your garden in the summer and fall, plant Washington Filifera (the birds feast on the date fruit) and Fraxinus species for the seeds produced in the fall.

FRAGRANT CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANTS FOR THE GARDEN | Gardening for fragrance opens up another dimension of gardening. You can be whisked back to another place and time or other remembrances by the fragrances given off by your plantings. Once you start noticing aromas, you will quickly come up with your own favorites. Since everyone’s sense of smell is different, fragrances are open to different interpretations.

NATIVE PLANTS THAT ATTRACT BUTTERFLIES | The most important plants for caterpillars are buckwheat, California lilac (Ceanothus), deerweed and milk vetch and lupines, mallows, oaks, rock cress and other mustards, and grasses. Unless you provide larval food plants in your garden or nearby, the number of adult butterflies will be limited. The butterflies of San Luis Obispo County are listed, with the host/food plant of the caterpillar. In most cases the food (nectar plant) of the adult butterfly is also given.

Three Native Garden lists

North County Plant List | PDF Templeton Residence on Jack Creek Plant List

A List of California Native Plants and Their Garden Needs |  PDF list updated, updated 2015 by  Marti Rutherford

Atascadero Native Garden | PDF listing of the natives in this San Jacinto Avenue, Atascadero garden

Atascadero Native Garden | PDF Listing of the natives in this Dolores Avenue, Atascadero garden

 

 

Seed Collection and Saving for the Casual Gardener

This document talks about why and when to collect native plant seeds and offers tips for collecting and storing seeds. By Marti Rutherford, CNPS-SLO, April 2016

 

How to Handle Deer Problems in Your Garden

This article helps you determine if you have a low, moderate, or high level of “browse” and suggests the appropriate methods for combating your problem. Also included is a  brief list of plants that have shown some success in deer-prone areas.

 

View Posts by Category

< 2019 >
August
  • 01

    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    08-01-2019
    SLO Vets Hall
    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    CNPS will hold its first-ever meeting in August, on Thursday, August 1st, at the SLO Vets’ Hall at 7:00 pm. The Greg Rubinfeatured speaker will Greg Rubin, an expert in native residential landscape design with special emphasis on fire resistant species.  Greg will talk on his experience in Southern California, working in chaparral ecosystems.  He will present the current approach to best practices for fire-safe plant selection and placement in suburban environs.

    Greg Rubin, President and Founder of California’s Own Native Landscape Design, Inc. is a licensed landscape contractor who has worked with California native plants since 1985.  His company has designed over 700 native landscapes in Southern California. Specialties include residential, commercial, and institutional landscapes that cover an array of garden styles, while providing year-round appeal, low maintenance, water efficiency, rich habitat, and fire-resistance.

    Greg has been featured in a number of periodicals including the Wall Street Journal, San Diego Union Tribune and Los Angeles Times, and magazines such as Sunset, San Diego Home and Garden, California Gardener and Kiplinger’s. Media coverage includes repeat appearances on NPR. Greg regularly gives presentations and workshops on native plants to conferences, garden clubs and other organizations throughout Southern California.

    Greg is co-author of a new book with Lucy Warren, “The California Native Landscape: The Homeowners’ Design Guide to Restoring its Beauty and Balance”, published by Timber Press.  This popular native horticultural work covers all aspects of native landscape design.  Greg also served on the boards of the Agua Hedionda Lagoon Foundation, California Native Plant Society, the Lux Art Institute, and the Garden Native foundation.

  • 03

    All day
    08-03-2019
    Junction of Nacimiento-Fergusson Road and Coast Ridge Road
    Forest Rte 22S05, Big Sur, CA 93920, USA

    Update 8/1:

    The CNPS mountain bike ride is still on for Saturday, August 3rd, but the venue has been changed due to the Mill Fire to San Simeon Creek Road.

    Carpooling is still available from Santa Rosa Park in SLO at 7:30am.
    We will meet at the San Simeon State Park Day Use Area – park and ride – at 8:30am.

    See you there!


    Ride the Coast Ridge Road to the Cone Peak trailhead, then hike to the summit (5,155 ft.) and return. Along the way, take in the amazing views and see some rare plants – Santa Lucia fir and Sugar pine. Meet at the junction of Nacimiento-Fergusson Road and Coast Ridge Road (36°00’35.7″N  121°27’08.3″W) at 10:30 am. For a carpool option, meet either at Santa Rosa Park in San Luis Obispo at 7:30 am or at the Washburn Day Use Area of San Simeon State Park, 1.5 miles north of Cambria (35°35’40.7″N 121°07’27.2″W), 8:20 am. The bike ride is 11 miles round trip to the Cone Peak trailhead and back. The hike is 5 miles round trip.  Bring a helmet, water, lunch, snacks, sunscreen, as well as shoes/boots and a hat for the hike.  Also, bring a cable lock for your bike to use during the hike.  For those interested in carpooling, a pickup truck is preferable to transport others and their gear.  For more information, contact Bill Waycott (805) 459-2103, bill.waycott@gmail.com.

  • 16

    All day
    08-16-2019-08-18-2019

    Friday afternoon to Sunday afternoon, Aug. 16th to Aug. 18th

    The California Native Plant Society is conducting a rare plant survey in the Lopez Lake area with a species focus on Malacothamnus gracilis, slender bush mallow, a 1B.1 listed plant. Members will help to assess this rare plant’s distribution and take part in the collection of seeds as part of the California Plant Rescue program, www.caplantrescue.org.

    This Treasure Hunt is coordinated by Amy Patten and Keir Morse, CNPS staff, whose sole job is to seek out rare and, in many cases, endangered species. Participants must be in good physical condition, due to the steep terrain and chaparral vegetation, and have basic skills in plant identification. Afternoon temperatures in August can reach the mid 90s.  If interested in joining the team for a day or the entire weekend, participants need to sign up via Eventbrite:

    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/malacothamnus-gracilis-rare-plant-treasure-hunt-registration-61706735507.  Contact Bill Waycott if you have questions, bill.waycott@gmail.com.

  • 17

    All day
    08-17-2019-08-18-2019

    Friday afternoon to Sunday afternoon, Aug. 16th to Aug. 18th

    The California Native Plant Society is conducting a rare plant survey in the Lopez Lake area with a species focus on Malacothamnus gracilis, slender bush mallow, a 1B.1 listed plant. Members will help to assess this rare plant’s distribution and take part in the collection of seeds as part of the California Plant Rescue program, www.caplantrescue.org.

    This Treasure Hunt is coordinated by Amy Patten and Keir Morse, CNPS staff, whose sole job is to seek out rare and, in many cases, endangered species. Participants must be in good physical condition, due to the steep terrain and chaparral vegetation, and have basic skills in plant identification. Afternoon temperatures in August can reach the mid 90s.  If interested in joining the team for a day or the entire weekend, participants need to sign up via Eventbrite:

    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/malacothamnus-gracilis-rare-plant-treasure-hunt-registration-61706735507.  Contact Bill Waycott if you have questions, bill.waycott@gmail.com.

  • 18

    All day
    08-18-2019-08-18-2019

    Friday afternoon to Sunday afternoon, Aug. 16th to Aug. 18th

    The California Native Plant Society is conducting a rare plant survey in the Lopez Lake area with a species focus on Malacothamnus gracilis, slender bush mallow, a 1B.1 listed plant. Members will help to assess this rare plant’s distribution and take part in the collection of seeds as part of the California Plant Rescue program, www.caplantrescue.org.

    This Treasure Hunt is coordinated by Amy Patten and Keir Morse, CNPS staff, whose sole job is to seek out rare and, in many cases, endangered species. Participants must be in good physical condition, due to the steep terrain and chaparral vegetation, and have basic skills in plant identification. Afternoon temperatures in August can reach the mid 90s.  If interested in joining the team for a day or the entire weekend, participants need to sign up via Eventbrite:

    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/malacothamnus-gracilis-rare-plant-treasure-hunt-registration-61706735507.  Contact Bill Waycott if you have questions, bill.waycott@gmail.com.