CNPS-SLO encourages the use of California Native plants in public and private gardens and landscapes, and offers information about how to plan, start, and maintain native plant gardens and landscapes that are both ecologically beneficial and personally enjoyable .

Please take the time to cruise though the articles and information in this section of our site. We hope you reach out to us if you have questions about topics not covered here.

Also, if you have expertise in native plant gardening and would like to contribute, we would love to hear from you!

Why Should I Incorporate Native Plants In My Own Garden?

In addition to their natural beauty, natives provide water-conserving, drought-tolerant and sustainable garden design choices. For more information about the benefits of incorporating native plants in your own garden, click here.

What are Native Plants and Why are They Important?

To learn more about the importance of native plant conservation, please click here.

NATIVE PLANTS THAT ATTRACT BIRDS | A very thorough list of native plants with the type of bird that each plant attracts, the part of the plant that is used and in which season. For example, if you wish to see Cedar Waxwings in your garden in the summer and fall, plant Washington Filifera (the birds feast on the date fruit) and Fraxinus species for the seeds produced in the fall.

FRAGRANT CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANTS FOR THE GARDEN | Gardening for fragrance opens up another dimension of gardening. You can be whisked back to another place and time or other remembrances by the fragrances given off by your plantings. Once you start noticing aromas, you will quickly come up with your own favorites. Since everyone’s sense of smell is different, fragrances are open to different interpretations.

NATIVE PLANTS THAT ATTRACT BUTTERFLIES | The most important plants for caterpillars are buckwheat, California lilac (Ceanothus), deerweed and milk vetch and lupines, mallows, oaks, rock cress and other mustards, and grasses. Unless you provide larval food plants in your garden or nearby, the number of adult butterflies will be limited. The butterflies of San Luis Obispo County are listed, with the host/food plant of the caterpillar. In most cases the food (nectar plant) of the adult butterfly is also given.

Three Native Garden lists

North County Plant List | PDF Templeton Residence on Jack Creek Plant List

A List of California Native Plants and Their Garden Needs |  PDF list updated, updated 2015 by  Marti Rutherford

Atascadero Native Garden | PDF listing of the natives in this San Jacinto Avenue, Atascadero garden

Atascadero Native Garden | PDF Listing of the natives in this Dolores Avenue, Atascadero garden

 

 

Seed Collection and Saving for the Casual Gardener

This document talks about why and when to collect native plant seeds and offers tips for collecting and storing seeds. By Marti Rutherford, CNPS-SLO, April 2016

 

How to Handle Deer Problems in Your Garden

This article helps you determine if you have a low, moderate, or high level of “browse” and suggests the appropriate methods for combating your problem. Also included is a  brief list of plants that have shown some success in deer-prone areas.

 

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< 2019 >
February
  • 02

    9:00 am-12:00 pm
    02-02-2019
    Coon Creek trailhead and parking lot
    Pecho Valley Rd, Los Osos, CA 93402, USA

    CANCELLED

    Saturday, Feb. 2, 9:00 am, 

    Point Buchon Trail, Montaña de Oro State Park

    Meet at the Coon Creek Trailhead parking lot at the south end of MDO.

    We will walk to the PG&E kiosk and sign in. The hike is 6.6 miles roundtrip with a 300 ft. elevation change. Come prepared to talk about birds, plants, and discover the picturesque headlands (binoculars recommended). There is also the possibility we may have access to some of the interior portions of the PG&E property.

    Bring water, snacks, and dress in layers for changing weather.  A hat and sturdy shoes are advised.

    Contact Bill, 805-459-2103.


    IMAGE

    2 of 3 California Coast Live Oak Quercus agrifolia Forest along the Coon Creek Trail in Montana de Oro State Park, Los Osos, CA, 20 May 2010. Photo by “Mike” Michael L. Baird, mike at mikebaird d o t com, flickr.bairdphotos.com, Nikon P6000.

    “Mike” Michael L. Baird, flickr.bairdphotos.com

  • 07

    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    02-07-2019
    SLO Vets Hall
    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    “Boyd’s Black-Haired Bug”

    Robert S. Boyd is Alumni Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University, Alabama.

    He received his doctorate in Botany from the University of California, Davis in 1986, and a master’s and undergraduate degree from Cal Poly Pomona. He is currently teaching conservation biology and has taught botany and ecology at Auburn University since 1988. His research interests include the management of rare and endangered plants, as well as the ecology and evolution of metal “hyperaccumulator” plants. These are plants that take unusually large amounts of metals into their tissues. In fact, Bob has had an insect species, “Boyd’s Black-Haired Bug” (Melanotrichus boydi) named after him for his work in this area. The bug feeds on the milkwort jewelflower (Streptanthus polygaloides), a nickel hyperaccumulator endemic to the Sierra Nevada.