Opening the World through Journaling

Opening the World through Journaling

CNPS Curriculum - Opening the World through Journaling: Integrating art, science, and language arts by John Muir Laws and Emily Bruenig Our parent organization, CNPS, is offering a spectacular curriculum for children that works in a multitude of settings from school...

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Native Plants for School & Urban Gardens

Native Plants for School & Urban Gardens

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANTS FOR SCHOOL & URBAN GARDENS By Betsey Landis Los Angeles/Santa Monica Mountains Chapter, California Native Plant Society www.lacnps.org August 2011 This book is written for teachers and school garden educators and planners. Anyone...

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< 2019 >
February
  • 02

    9:00 am-12:00 pm
    02-02-2019
    Coon Creek trailhead and parking lot
    Pecho Valley Rd, Los Osos, CA 93402, USA

    CANCELLED

    Saturday, Feb. 2, 9:00 am, 

    Point Buchon Trail, Montaña de Oro State Park

    Meet at the Coon Creek Trailhead parking lot at the south end of MDO.

    We will walk to the PG&E kiosk and sign in. The hike is 6.6 miles roundtrip with a 300 ft. elevation change. Come prepared to talk about birds, plants, and discover the picturesque headlands (binoculars recommended). There is also the possibility we may have access to some of the interior portions of the PG&E property.

    Bring water, snacks, and dress in layers for changing weather.  A hat and sturdy shoes are advised.

    Contact Bill, 805-459-2103.


    IMAGE

    2 of 3 California Coast Live Oak Quercus agrifolia Forest along the Coon Creek Trail in Montana de Oro State Park, Los Osos, CA, 20 May 2010. Photo by “Mike” Michael L. Baird, mike at mikebaird d o t com, flickr.bairdphotos.com, Nikon P6000.

    “Mike” Michael L. Baird, flickr.bairdphotos.com

  • 07

    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    02-07-2019
    SLO Vets Hall
    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    “Boyd’s Black-Haired Bug”

    Robert S. Boyd is Alumni Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University, Alabama.

    He received his doctorate in Botany from the University of California, Davis in 1986, and a master’s and undergraduate degree from Cal Poly Pomona. He is currently teaching conservation biology and has taught botany and ecology at Auburn University since 1988. His research interests include the management of rare and endangered plants, as well as the ecology and evolution of metal “hyperaccumulator” plants. These are plants that take unusually large amounts of metals into their tissues. In fact, Bob has had an insect species, “Boyd’s Black-Haired Bug” (Melanotrichus boydi) named after him for his work in this area. The bug feeds on the milkwort jewelflower (Streptanthus polygaloides), a nickel hyperaccumulator endemic to the Sierra Nevada.