The mission of the California Native Plant Society is to increase understanding and appreciation of California’s native plants and to conserve them and their natural habitats through education, science, advocacy, horticulture and land stewardship.

Dedicated to the preservation of California's native plants

Hot Topics

Where are the flowers

Where are the flowers

Participate in the new effort to use digital images to investigate ​phenological change in a biodiversity hotspot​ – California. 

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President’s notes – December 2019

Over the years, Dr. David Keil, professor emeritus Cal Poly-SLO, has documented the plants of California with an emphasis on plants of San Luis Obispo County and nearby regions. These lists represent a mountain of work, where he has carefully noted every species occurring in a particular area and later revisited the area to add and/or modify his findings.

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Workshop Committee Forming

CNPS-SLO needs a couple of dedicated volunteers to help with workshop planning in 2020. 4-6 hrs per month, mix of email communications, behind the scenes organizing, and coordination meetings. Free workshop registration! To sign-up or inquire, please email mailto:info.cnpsslo@gmail.comby January 15. 

Invasive Species Report: Bull thistle Cirsium vulgare

Invasive Species Report: Bull thistle Cirsium vulgare

A member of the Asteraceae family, bull thistle is an annual herb native to Europe and is widespread in California and listed as a noxious weed in Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon and Washington. It is found in every state in the U.S. and on every continent except Antarctica. It is a problem in some natural areas such as Yosemite National Park, California

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Your spring wildflower garden

It’s time to start thinking about planting your wildflower garden with the winter rains coming soon. As in years past, we are beginning our rainy season late with a dry fall so far. This doesn’t mean we will have a dry winter, but this dry pattern is important when it comes to sowing our wildflower garden.

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Download and Print the new CNPS-SLO Planting Guide
thumbnail SLO Planting guide

 
Tetragonia tetragonoides (New Zealand Spinach)

Tetragonia tetragonoides (New Zealand Spinach)

New Zealand spinach belongs to a family of flowering plants, Aizoaceae, that is primarily native to the Southern Hemisphere. New Zealand spinach is, in fact native to Southern Africa but has spread to New Zealand and is apparently a serious weed throughout southern Australia. Obviously, it has also been introduced into North America and Eurasia.

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Event Calendar

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  • Water Resilient Landscape Design Workshop
    1:00 pm-3:00 pm
    12-04-2019

    The workshop will introduce rainwater, stormwater and greywater tools that can be applicable in urban, suburban or rural situations. The demonstration site we will be on is more rural in nature. We will also talk about integrating these tools into education so we would like to invite interested educators as well as homeowners.

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  • Place to Land: Conserving Habitats for People, Plants, and Wildlife
    7:00 pm-9:13 pm
    12-05-2019

    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    CHAPTER MEETING Dec 5th 2019 – Thursday – 7pm, social, 7:30pm program

    Place to Land: Conserving Habitats for People, Plants, and Wildlife

    Daniel Bohlman and Lindsey Roddick of the Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County

    The Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County has been protecting diverse landscapes throughout San Luis Obispo County for the last 30 years. Land conservation has had intentional and unintentionally benefits for rare and common plants. Daniel Bohlman and Lindsey Roddick of the Land Conservancy will share how this non-profit organization has succeeded in protected important landscapes and how those conservation actions have benefited natural communities throughout San Luis Obispo County.

    Daniel Bohlman

    Daniel Bohlman has worked on conserving the Central Coast for the last 18 years through his work at The Nature Conservancy, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and for the last 14 years at The Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County. He is currently the Deputy Director and works closely with local land owners to preserve the Central Coast landscape.

    Lindsey Roddick

    Lindsey Roddick

    Lindsey Roddick is the Senior Restoration Ecologist at The Land Conservancy and ensures stewardship of the land under The Land Conservancy’s care is ecologically sound and provides for long-term health of the landscape.

     

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  • Mushroom Walk, Cambria
    All day
    12-21-2019

    Saturday. Dec. 21st, 10:00 am, Mushroom Walk, Cambria

    Led by Eric Brunschwiler, David Krause, and Dennis Sheridan

    We will look for mushrooms growing in the Monterey pine forests of Cambria while enjoying the beauty of the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve. Meet at the corner of Tipton Street and Warren Road in Cambria at 10:00 AM. How to get there: Travel north on Hwy 1 to Cambria. At the first stoplight, turn left onto Ardath Drive. Follow Ardath and turn right onto Tipton Street. Continue to the intersection with Warren Road (2 blocks) and find a parking place. Bring water, your field guides and a mushroom basket for you may want to collect some edible varieties. Dress appropriately for the weather. Be prepared for poison oak. The hike will be easy, about a 2-3 hour stroll through the woods. For additional information, email, text, or call Dave Krause: dkincmbria@aol.com, (805) 459-9007.

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Volunteer at the Hoover Herbarium

Where is the Hoover Herbarium located?

The Hoover Herbarium is located on Cal Poly SLO campus on the 3rd floor of the Fisher Science Building (33) in rooms 352 and 359. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu

What do volunteers do?

During the volunteer sessions at the Hoover Herbarium, people can take part in any number of activities.  One of our primary responsibilities is mounting new specimens.  This involves taking dried and pressed plants and glueing them to paper.  When we mount plants, we do it in such a way that those specimens will last for hundreds of years.  Each specimen is a physical record of what plants occurred where and when.  Without this valuable information we wouldn’t know when a species goes extinct, expands or contracts its range, or where species occur.  After mounting, the specimens are databased and geo-referenced.  Then they are filed into the main collection. We have over 80,000 specimens at the Hoover Herbarium.  We are also working on a SLO Voucher Collection, which will contain one representative specimen for each species in the county.  Volunteers look through our specimens and pick the one that should be added to the Voucher Collection.  Additionally, we are actively working on our moss and lichen collections.  Volunteers can choose what aspects of the work they would like to participate in.  Anyone and everyone is welcome. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu

What days/hours do you need volunteers?

Hoover Herbarium volunteers sessions are Monday 3-5 pm and Friday 9 – 1. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu

Where do I park?

Parking permits are required on campus Monday through Thursday, 7:00 am through 10:00 pm; and Friday, 7:00 am through 5:00 pm. You can either buy a $6 day pass, a $4 3-hr pass, park in a metered space, ride the bus, or park off campus and walk in. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu 

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PHOTO GALLERY

Fiscalini Ranch, January, 2019. Cambria, California. Marlin Harms.

Hypogymnia sp., Tube Lichen. Marlin Harms.

Phaeolus schweinitzii, Dyer’s Polypore.
Marlin Harms.

Mycena purpureofusca, Cone-dwelling Mycena. On cone of Monterey Pine, Pinus radiata. Marlin Harms.

Coastal Lichens on Rock–Caloplaca & Acarospora. 
Marlin Harms

Gymnopilus spectabilis, Laughing Gym, After Showers. Marlin Harms.