The mission of the California Native Plant Society is to increase understanding and appreciation of California’s native plants and to conserve them and their natural habitats through education, science, advocacy, horticulture and land stewardship.

Dedicated to the preservation of California's native plants

CANCELLED EVENTS DUE TO COVID-19
updated 3/19/20 7pm
 

In the interest of public health, and to support local efforts to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, the Chapter is cancelling ALL events until April 19. Check back here for updates.

The outdoor workshop “Plant ID in the Field” scheduled for May 16 is still planned but may be cancelled if necessary due to health concerns. At this time, we are continuing with scheduled outdoor field trips, weather permitting. If you have signed up for the April 18 Rare Plant Communities Workshop, you should have already received a refund.

In the meantime in these unusual times, we recommend you continue to enjoy California’s native plants in ways that are no-risk to our human communities. Continue to hike outdoors by yourself or with your family. Share what you are finding on the trails by posting photos to the CNPS-SLO Facebook page or CNPS State Facebook page. Download your observations to CalFlora. Social media shares will lift people’s spirits and provide lasting data about the location of native plants. Weed your native plant garden at home or start new native plants for future planting.

And note we are continuing to monitor the situation and will update you as other activities change.

Hot Topics

Meet our Social Media Intern, Kieran

Kieran Althaus joined our team last fall doing Social Media work along side Judi Young for the chapter. He is soon going to start his Masters Degree at Cal Poly in Biology with Dr. Matt Ritter and Dr. Jenn Yost. In the mean time he is staying occupied with the Plant Science Club at Cal Poly, as well as working on a variety of Botany projects.

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Invasive Species Report: Purple Ragwort (Senecio elegans)

Invasive Species Report: Purple Ragwort (Senecio elegans)

An attractive member of the Asteraceae (Sunflower) family Senecio elegans is an erect annual herb, up to 1 ft. tall and to 1.5 ft. wide. It is native to Southern Africa and is distributed along coastal California. In northern San Luis Obispo County there are groups at San Simeon Point and at the other end of the county in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes.

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Poetry Initiative for the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day

This is a Call for Ecological Poetry/Prose/Art and Discourse throughout SLO County to unite with the cause initiated 50 years ago. Gathering stories to be Stewards of the Earth, this perspective can help direct hope for Earth, Forever. If you have a venue or poem and would like an Earth Day Poem reach out to muebersax61@gmail.com Mary Uebersax, EarthTones Gifts, Gallery & Center for Healing 805-238-4413

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Garden Maintenance

My garden is small compared to the ones I manage in my horticulture business, but it’s still a hideaway for the birds, bees and native plants. It’s calming and is a source of tranquility for myself and my family. During difficult times, and I’m sure you have...

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Matteo Garbelotto’s Letter on our next Sudden Oak Death (SOD) Blitz

The USFS has just released the 2019 tree mortality data, and in 2019 alone, a million tanoaks were dead because of SOD. SOD is moving to new Counties outside of the current area of infestation, and even in our Bay Area neighborhoods, SOD of 2019 is not the same SOD of 10 years ago: different distribution, new local outbreaks, and new hosts are emerging, as the disease becomes more and more established in its new home.

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Download and Print the new CNPS-SLO Planting Guide
thumbnail SLO Planting guide

 
RETAIL SALES POSITION OPEN WE BADLY NEED A VOLUNTEER TO MANAGE OUR BOOK/T-SHIRT SALES TABLE. CONTACT MELISSA MOONEY
The Morro Manzanita Chaparral Natural Community

The Morro Manzanita Chaparral Natural Community

Morro manzanita is the dominant vascular plant species of a rare natural community known as Morro manzanita chaparral, the Arctostaphylos morroensis Shrubland Alliance, as defined by the Manual of California Vegetation. This is an example of a natural community that is dominated by a listed species. Not all sensitive natural communities are.

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Event Calendar

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  • Rinconada, Big Falls, Little Falls loop
    All day
    02-01-2020

    Saturday, Feb. 1st, 8:30 am

    This is a strenuous hike of 16 miles and 2,500 ft. elevation gain and will likely take most of the day. Carpool in front of the Pacific Beverage Co. in Santa Margarita at 8:00 am or meet at the Rinconada trailhead at 8:30 am. The Rinconada trailhead is located on Pozo Road, 2.5 miles southeast of the Santa Margarita Lake Road intersection and is well marked with signage just ahead of a righthand turn. Be sure to bring adequate water and food, a hat, sturdy shoes, and dress in layers for the weather. There will be a couple of stream crossings, so please bring either waterproof shoes, or flipflops/sandals. Also, there will be poison oak. Dogs are welcome on a leash. Contact Bill, 805-459-2103.

    Rain or the threat of rain cancels.

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  • Chapter Meeting: Discovering Mono County Plants
    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    02-06-2020

    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    Penstemon Monoensis

    Program speaker: Ann Howald

    Mixer and Browse Sales Table 7:00 pm, Program 7:30 pm

    Howald imageAnn is a retired botanist who attended UC Santa Barbara, and was a teacher, consultant, and agency botanist during her working life. Her retirement project is to complete an annotated checklist of the plants of Mono County, where she now lives in the summer in her Airstream trailer, a used model refurbished as her botany lab. Her winter work takes her to herbaria all over the state, where she studies plant collections from Mono County made by others. She also is a fieldtrip leader and weed puller for the Milo Baker and Bristlecone chapters of CNPS.

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  • Audubon and CA Native Plant Walk, Santa Margarita Lake
    All day
    02-22-2020

    Saturday, Feb. 22nd 9:00 am

    Join us on a bird and plant walk. For those wanting to focus mainly on birds (freshwater fowl), you will walk along the south lakeshore for a distance of roughly two miles. The bird hike will be limited to 20 people; please email Chuck to reserve a spot at woodard@live.com. For those wanting to focus on both birds and plants, you will hike the Grey Pine Trail, returning along the lakeshore. The Grey Pine Trial hugs the north-facing hills on the lake’s south edge. This walk is roughly 3.5 miles with 300 feet elevation gain. Santa Margarita County Park is located off of West Pozo Rd., 10 miles southeast of Santa Margarita, CA. At mile-9 along Pozo Rd., bear left onto Santa Margarita Lake Rd. When you arrive at the park entrance, tell the ranger you are part of the bird and plant group, then proceed to the adjacent parking lot on the right, just inside the park. Bring water and snacks and binoculars, and dress in layers for changing weather. A hat, sunscreen, and sturdy shoes are recommended. No dogs please. Contact Bill, 805-459-2103.

    Rain or the threat of rain cancels.

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Volunteer at the Hoover Herbarium

Where is the Hoover Herbarium located?

The Hoover Herbarium is located on Cal Poly SLO campus on the 3rd floor of the Fisher Science Building (33) in rooms 352 and 359. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu

What do volunteers do?

During the volunteer sessions at the Hoover Herbarium, people can take part in any number of activities.  One of our primary responsibilities is mounting new specimens.  This involves taking dried and pressed plants and glueing them to paper.  When we mount plants, we do it in such a way that those specimens will last for hundreds of years.  Each specimen is a physical record of what plants occurred where and when.  Without this valuable information we wouldn’t know when a species goes extinct, expands or contracts its range, or where species occur.  After mounting, the specimens are databased and geo-referenced.  Then they are filed into the main collection. We have over 80,000 specimens at the Hoover Herbarium.  We are also working on a SLO Voucher Collection, which will contain one representative specimen for each species in the county.  Volunteers look through our specimens and pick the one that should be added to the Voucher Collection.  Additionally, we are actively working on our moss and lichen collections.  Volunteers can choose what aspects of the work they would like to participate in.  Anyone and everyone is welcome. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu

What days/hours do you need volunteers?

Hoover Herbarium volunteers sessions are Monday 3-5 pm and Friday 9 – 1. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu

Where do I park?

Parking permits are required on campus Monday through Thursday, 7:00 am through 10:00 pm; and Friday, 7:00 am through 5:00 pm. You can either buy a $6 day pass, a $4 3-hr pass, park in a metered space, ride the bus, or park off campus and walk in. Questions: email Jenn Yost at jyost@calpoly.edu 

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PHOTO GALLERY

Fiscalini Ranch, January, 2019. Cambria, California. Marlin Harms.

Hypogymnia sp., Tube Lichen. Marlin Harms.

Phaeolus schweinitzii, Dyer’s Polypore.
Marlin Harms.

Mycena purpureofusca, Cone-dwelling Mycena. On cone of Monterey Pine, Pinus radiata. Marlin Harms.

Coastal Lichens on Rock–Caloplaca & Acarospora. 
Marlin Harms

Gymnopilus spectabilis, Laughing Gym, After Showers. Marlin Harms.