Dedicated to the preservation of California's native plants

The mission of the California Native Plant Society is to increase understanding and appreciation of California’s native plants and to conserve them and their natural habitats through education, science, advocacy, horticulture and land stewardship.

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Defeat Dudleya Poaching through Propagation

Defeat Dudleya Poaching through Propagation

California Dudleyas are easy to grow. Illegal wild collection can be disrupted via legal propagation. I propagate Dudleya with middle school science classes. If seventh-graders can grow these natives from seed, you can too. Home gardens are a good source of Dudleya...

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Sudden Oak Death Not Yet Arrived in SLO County

Good news on the Sudden Oak Death front. As a result of last spring’s Sudden Oak Death Blitz, and additional collecting by agency staff, we find that. as yet, there were no positive finds in SLO County. In all, 699 trees were surveyed, of which 18.7% appeared symptomatic, but which did not test positive in the lab.

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In Memory of Bill Deneen

In Memory of Bill Deneen

Bill Deneen, long time CNPS member, Hoover Awardee, and champion of the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes died at the age of 93 in September. Bill taught biology at Santa Maria High School  for 25 years, during which time he became a passionate advocate for the environment.

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Exotic Species on the Central Coast Part II

Exotic Species on the Central Coast Part II

Last month I wrote about my curiosity for the origin and distribution of some of the invasive plants that have become naturalized on the Central Coast. I continue this month with exerts from historical accounts. These come from an article published in the Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences, October 1920, …

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Chapter Meeting: Plant Propagation by Elliot Paulson

Chapter Meeting: Plant Propagation by Elliot Paulson

CHAPTER MEETING Nov. 1st  2018 - Thursday - 7:00 pm Veterans Hall, Monterey and Grand, SLO Mixer and Browse Sales Table 7:00 pm, Program 7:30 pm PLANT PROPAGATION by ELLIOT PAULSON Elliot graduated from Cal Poly in business finance, and horticulture. He established...

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Blue Elderberry (Sambucus coerulea or mexicana)

Blue Elderberry (Sambucus coerulea or mexicana)

ETHNOBOTANY NOTES: Blue Elderberry (Sambucus coerulea or mexicana) A delicious, wildlife attracting addition to your garden This last year, I have become the Johnny Appleseed of elderberry plants. Although, I plant the elderberry plants and not the seeds. I have been...

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Chapter Board Elections 2018-2019

The Nomination Committee presents the following slate of candidates:  President: Bill Waycott, continuing; For Vice President: Nishanta ‘Nishi’ Rajakaruna; Treasurer: Dave Krause, continuing; For Secretary: Cindy Roessler.

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Capturing California’s Flowers: An image is worth a thousand words

Digitization of herbarium specimens—capturing images and label data in digital formats—remains an enormous task for the world’s herbaria. For 22 institutions in the U.S. state of California, this job has become easier with a new 4-year, $1.8 million National Science Foundation grant (Award # 1802301) to establish a new California Phenology Thematic Collections Network (TCN). Spearheaded by Dr. Jenn Yost …

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Beechey ground squirrel

California ground squirrel aka Beechey ground squirrel (Otospermophilus beecheyi), may look cute or even cuddly, but ground squirrels could be the worst things to hit your garden since your cousin came to visit in his RV. No, seriously, this last year saw an explosion of the squirrel population due to the late but heavy March rain…

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Vitis californica (California grape)

Vitis californica (California grape)

As well as reddish fruits, this variety of wine grape produces bright red leaves in the fall. Enter DNA to the story. Several DNA studies proved that the cultivar ‘Roger’s Red’ is truly a hybrid between the native California grape and the European wine grape Vitis vinifera var. Alicante Bouschet.

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2018 Native Plant Sale

2018 Native Plant Sale

Saturday, November 3, 2018, 9am-2pm, Please join us at Pacific Beach High School, 11950 Los Osos Valley Road SLO (at the Target intersection)

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Event Calendar

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  • Chapter Meeting featuring Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson
    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    06-07-2018

    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    801 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    The CNPS San Luis Obispo monthly meeting is Thursday, June 7 at the San Luis Obispo Veterans Hall. From 7:00 to 7:30 pm we will have the usual social part of our monthly meeting, followed at 7:30 by a chapter business meeting.

    Program: The Ethnobotany and Associated Stewardship of California Black Oak/Mixed Conifer Forest Ecosystems in the Central and Southern Sierra Nevada as a Model for Restoring Forest Health: Ethnobotany professor Kat Anderson.

    Kat Anderson has a Ph.D. in Wildland Resource Science from UC Berkeley and is the author of the book Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources. The book was recently chosen by the celebrated permaculture designer Ben Falk, as one of the most important books to read in order to permanently solve food security. Kat has worked with Native Americans for over 25 years, learning how indigenous people judiciously gather and steward native plants and ecosystems in the wild. Her interests are to learn about, celebrate, and restore the similar plant uses, gathering and tending practices, and ethical stances towards nature that are in multiple local cultures here and all around the world.

    This talk will discuss the importance of California black oak and associate trees and understory species of the mixed conifer forests to the indigenous people of the Sierra Nevada for food, clothing, basketry, firewood, medicines, and household utensils. The audience will learn about the tremendous stewardship legacy of Sierran Tribes: how they knocked the oak trees with long poles and pruned the branches which helped shape the trees canopies and removed dead or dying wood, and may have spurred new fruitwood growth. Black oaks were managed at the ecosystem level with frequent, low intensity Indian-set fires, in order to open up the forest, promote widely-spaced large-canopied, long-lived oaks and conifers with less insects and pathogens, foster useful legumes, and encourage edible and medicinal mushrooms. I will explore some of the potential results of indigenous stewardship that may contribute to forest health including enhanced mycorhizzal relationships with oaks and conifers, nutrient cycling, soil fertility, enhanced soil moisture-holding capacity, and biological action in the soil.

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  • Five of the Morros of San Luis Obispo County
    7:30 am-9:00 pm
    06-23-2018

    Islay Hill Trail, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    Islay Hill Trail, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA

    Saturday, June 23

    Join us for a day on the Morros and learn which plants grow on each of these volcanic plugs.  Ascend one, two, or more. Here are the start times.

    • 7:30 a.m. Islay Hill, 2 miles, 500 ft. gain, moderate. The easternmost of the Morros, with views of five others. To trailhead, take Tank Farm Rd. east past Orcutt Rd, then south on Spanish Oaks Dr., then east on Sweet Bay Lane to end.
    • 9:00 a.m. Cerro San Luis, 4 miles, 1,100 ft. gain, moderate. Has knockout views of SLO. Trailhead at the end of Marsh St., just before on-ramp to Hwy 101 south.
    • Lunch (optional): 11:15 am to 12:00 pm, Throop Park, corner of Cerro Romauldo Street and Cuesta Drive, in SLO.
    • 12:00 p.m. Bishop Peak, 3.5 miles, 950 ft. gain, moderately strenuous. Highest of all the Morros. From Hwy 1, go west on Highland Dr., then right on Patricia Drive. Park at trailhead on Patricia Dr. just before reaching Anacapa Circle.
    • 3:30 p.m. Cerro Cabrillo, 2.5 miles, 800 ft. gain, moderately strenuous. 360-degree views from the Santa Lucia Mts. to coastline. Meet at Quarry Trail trailhead on South Bay Blvd, 1.4 miles south of Hwy 1 or 0.4 miles north of Turri Rd.
    • 6:00 p.m. Black Hill, 3.0 miles, 650 ft. gain, moderate. Ocean views from Montaña de Oro north to San Simeon. From South Bay Blvd, drive into Morro Bay State Park on State Park Road.  Meet at the parking area on the north side of the road, next to restrooms opposite the boat marina, just east of the campground entrance.

    Bring water (if hiking more than one Morro, store extra water in your vehicle), lunch and snacks, and dress in layers for changing weather. The day is likely to start and end cool but be quite warm at mid-day. A hat, sunscreen, and sturdy hiking shoes are essential. For more information, contact Bill, (805) 459-2103, bill.waycott@gmail.com.

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  • Guidetti Ranch hikes with EcoSLO docents
    All day
    06-30-2018

    1124 Nipomo St Suite A, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

    1124 Nipomo St Suite A, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

    The trail to Indian Knob, the tallest of the hills south of San Luis Obispo, starts on the Guidetti Ranch near the airport. Access to this area is restricted to a few hikes a year, sponsored by EcoSLO. As native plant enthusiasts, the goal of these hikes, in addition to enjoying the oak studded property and a 360o view at the top, is your chance to view one of the rarest plants in this county, the Indian Knob Mountain Balm, Eriodictyon altissimum. According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service: when this plant was federally listed as an endangered species in 1994, there were fewer than 600 individuals known to exist. The Pismo clarkia, Clarkia speciose, ssp. immaculate, also occurs along this trail. Both of these species are listed by CNPS as extremely rare 1B.1 plants. 
     
    Please RSVP the EcoSLO docent listed below to hold a place for the hiking date that suits you and to receive more information about the hike.

    Saturday, June 30th at 9:00 AM with Dale – ds2040@gmail.com

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